A Look at Storm Water Management Pond #5


The City of Madison Engineering Division has, over the years as the City has expanded, installed six storm water detention ponds on UW-Madison Arboretum property.  This is Pond #5 on Monroe Street.

City of Madison storm water detention Pond #5 on Monroe Street.

City of Madison storm water detention Pond #5  looking NW towards Monroe Street.  The woody debris on top of the concrete culvert is not the work of beaver but marks the high water mark from this summer’s storms.

The storm water pond in Curtis Prairie is #1 (the first constructed); Pond #6 (formerly known as Secret Pond) is at the intersection of Nakoma Road and Manitou Way.

One of two storm water outlets in Pond #5 that direct storm water into the UW-Madison Arboretum's West Marsh.

One of two storm water outlets in Pond #5 that direct storm water into the UW-Madison Arboretum’s West Marsh.

The City of Madison’s six storm water detention ponds occupy over 25 acres in the UW-Madison Arboretum.

Storm water as it flows out of Pond #5 towards the Arboretum's West Marsh.

Storm water as it flows out of Pond #5 towards the Arboretum’s West Marsh. Notice the oily sheen on the water.  And this is how the water looks after “treatment” in the pond.

What is the bubbly, chocolate-colored substance (right center) floating on the surface?

Storm water flowing into West Marsh, traditionally a nesting site for a pair sandhill cranes.

Storm water flowing through a patch of reed canary grass on its way into West Marsh.

Because of the heavy rain overnight (2″ by 8am) and continuing this morning, the water level in the pond is likely to rise.

What a sight!

Green vegetation in lower left corner is garlic mustard; invasive cattails in the middle right.

 

view

Looking NW towards Monroe Street and its intersection with Glenway Street.  The red awnings belong to the Gates and Brovi restaurant.

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About Steve Glass

The blogger is a restoration ecologist practicing and writing in the Midwestern United States.
This entry was posted in City of Madison Engineering Division, Lake Wingra, Lake Wingra Watershed, Marion Dunn Pond, Storm water and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to A Look at Storm Water Management Pond #5

  1. Sandy Stark says:

    It definitely has looked worse since they re-managed it….I used to love walking around the pond, enjoying the plants, birds, occasional sounds of cranes and ducks. Now I avoid it.

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