Green Storm Water Infrastructure at Minnetrista in Muncie


Minnetrista means “gathering place by the waters”, in this case the White River that flows through Muncie in central Indiana.  Minnetrista is also the name of the home of the F.C.Ball family, the folks who gave their name to Ball jars, Ball State University and the I.U. Health Memorial Hospital in Muncie.

Gathering Place by the Waters.

Gathering Place by the Waters. Photo by Stephen B. Glass

I visited Minnetrista in July of 2012 not just to see the Ball Mansion and to view antique canning jars,  but also to visit with Horticulture Manager Dustin Stillinger and see the extensive gardens  and natural areas at Minnetrista that he manages.

Dustin gave me a wonderful tour of the Minnetrista campus on a pleasant morning in July of 2012.  While the formal themed gardens were gorgeous and meticulously maintained, what really caught my attention was the natural area and the numerous green infrastructure features were designed into the landscape–not added as an afterthought.

Below are photographs I took that day of just a few of the striking landscape features to slow down and infiltrate rainfall.

User friendly and visitor oriented signs are strategically placed at Minnetrista.

User friendly and visitor oriented signs are strategically placed at Minnetrista. Photo by Stephen B. Glass

A bioswale captures rainfall, slows its down, and infiltrates it before it has a chance to flow into the nearby White River.

A bioswale captures rainfall, slows its down, and infiltrates it before it has a chance to flow into the nearby White River just out of view to the right.  Photo by Stephen B. Glass.

The green infrastructure features are both functional and attractive.

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This rain garden and interpretive sign is typical of form meeting function at Minnetrista. Photo by Stephen B. Glass

Sometimes a bit of grey infrastructure can be turned green.

Photo by Stephen B. Glass

Why not try this at home?  Photo by Stephen B. Glass

Rip rap used to stabilize a steep slope.

Rip rap used to stabilize a steep slope and protect the White River.  Photo by Stephen B. Glass.

Dustin Stillinger and his staff should be justifiably proud of the thoughtful and gentle way they care for the land at Minnetrista.

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About Steve Glass

The blogger is a restoration ecologist practicing and writing in the Midwestern United States.
This entry was posted in Bioretention facility, Green stormwater infrastructure, Storm water, Stormwater best management practices and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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